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Building Regulations

Approved Document G

Sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency

(2010 edition, incorporating further 2010 amendments)

G1 Cold water supply

G2 Water efficiency

G3 Hot water supply and systems

G4 Sanitary conveniences and washing facilities

G5 Bathrooms

G6 Kitchens and food preparation areas


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Contents

Introduction

What is an Approved Document?

This document has been approved and issued by the Secretary of State to provide practical guidance on ways of complying with Requirements G1 to G6 and regulations 7 and 36 of the Building Regulations 2010 (SI 2000/2214) for England and Wales, as amended. The Building Regulations 2010 are referred to throughout the remainder of this Document as ‘the Building Regulations’. Where appropriate the Approved Document also gives guidance on relevant requirements in the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010 (SI 2000).

The intention of issuing Approved Documents is to provide guidance about compliance with specific aspects of the Building Regulations in some of the more common building situations. They include examples of what, in ordinary circumstances, may be reasonable provision for compliance with the relevant requirement(s) of the Building Regulations to which they refer.

If guidance in an Approved Document is followed there will be a presumption of compliance with the requirement(s) covered by the guidance. However, this presumption is not conclusive, so simply following guidance does not guarantee compliance in an individual case. It is also important to note that there may well be other ways of achieving compliance with the requirements. There is therefore no obligation to adopt any particular solution contained in this Approved Document if you would prefer to meet the relevant requirement in some other way. However, persons intending to carry out building work should always check with their Building Control Body (BCB), either the local authority or an Approved Inspector, that their proposals comply with Building Regulations.

The guidance contained in this Approved Document relates only to the particular requirements of the Building Regulations that the document addresses (see ‘Requirements’ below). However, building work may be subject to more than one requirement of the Building Regulations. In such cases the work will also have to comply with any other applicable requirements of the Building Regulations.

This document is one of a series that has been approved and issued by the Secretary of State for the purpose of providing practical guidance with respect to the requirements of Schedule 1 and regulation 7 of the Building Regulations 2010 (SI 2000/2214) for England and Wales.

At the back of this document is a list of all the documents that have been approved and issued by the Secretary of State for this purpose.

Consideration of technical risk

In relation to the installation of new and replacement sanitation and hot water services, building work must satisfy all the technical requirements set out in Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations. Attention should be paid in particular to the need to comply with Part A (Structure), Part B (Fire safety), Part C (Site preparation and resistance to contaminants and moisture), Part J (Combustion appliances and fuel storage systems), Part L (Conservation of fuel and power) and Part P (Electrical safety), as well as Part G.

How to use this Approved Document

In this document the following conventions have been adopted to assist understanding and interpretation:

a. Texts shown against a green background are extracts from the Building Regulations or Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations, and set out the legal requirements that relate to compliance with the sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency requirements of Building Regulations. It should be remembered however that, as noted above, building works must comply with all the other applicable provisions of Building Regulations.

b. Key terms are defined below and are printed in
bold italic text.

c. Details of technical publications referred to in the text of this document will be given in footnotes and repeated as end notes. A reference to a publication is likely to be made for one of two main reasons. The publication may contain additional or more comprehensive technical detail, which it would be impractical to include in full in this Document but which is needed to fully explain ways of meeting the requirements; or it is a source of more general information. The reason for the reference will be indicated in each case. The reference will be to a specified edition of the document. The Approved Document may be amended from time to time to include new references or to refer to revised editions where this aids compliance.

Where you can get further help

If you do not understand the technical guidance or other information set out in this Approved Document and the additional detailed technical references to which it directs you, there are a number of routes through which you can seek further assistance:

The Communities and Local Government website:
www.communities.gov.uk

The Planning Portal website:
www.planningportal.gov.uk

If you are the person undertaking the building work you can seek assistance either from your local authority building control service or from your approved inspector (depending on which building control service you are using, or intend to use, to certify compliance of your work with the requirements of the Building Regulations).

Businesses registered with a competent person self-certification scheme may be able to get technical advice from their scheme operator.

If your query is of a highly technical nature you may wish to seek the advice of a specialist, or industry technical body, in the area of concern.

Responsibility for compliance

It is important to remember that if you are the person (e.g. designer, builder, installer) carrying out building work to which any requirement of Building Regulations applies you have a responsibility to ensure that the work complies with any such requirement. The building owner may also have a responsibility for ensuring compliance with Building Regulation requirements and could be served with an enforcement notice in cases of non-compliance.

The requirements

This Approved Document, which takes effect on 6 April 2010, deals with the sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency requirements in the Building Regulations 2010.

Limitation on requirements

In accordance with regulation 8 of the Building Regulations, the requirements in Parts A to D, F to K and N and P (except for paragraphs G2, H2 and J7) of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations do not require anything to be done except for the purpose of securing reasonable standards of health and safety for persons in or about buildings (and any others who may be affected by buildings or matters connected with buildings).

Paragraph G2 is excluded from regulation 8 as it deals with the conservation of water. Paragraphs H2 and J7 are excluded from regulation 8 because they deal directly with prevention of the contamination of water and of oil pollution. Parts E and M (which deal, respectively, with resistance to the passage of sound, and access to and use of buildings) are excluded from regulation 8 because they address the welfare and convenience of building users. Part L is excluded from regulation 8 because it addresses the conservation of fuel and power. All these matters are amongst the purposes, other than health and safety, that may be addressed by Building Regulations.

General guidance

Key terms

The following are key terms used in this document:

Note: Terms shown with * are defined in legislation, either in the Building Act 1984 or the Building Regulations 2010, where the definition may be fuller than the definition given here.

BCB means Building Control Body: a local authority or an Approved Inspector.

*Building means any permanent or temporary building, but not any other kind of structure or erection, and a reference to a building includes a reference to part of a building. This includes dwellings (houses, flats) and public buildings.

*Building work includes the erection or extension of a building, the provision or extension of a
controlled service or fitting in or in connection with a
building, and the material alteration of a building, or a controlled service or fitting.

Combined temperature and pressure relief valve means a mechanically operated valve that opens to discharge water when a fixed (factory set) temperature or fixed (factory set) pressure is exceeded.

Controlled service or fitting includes a service or fitting subject to Schedule 1 requirements in respect of sanitation, hot water safety, water efficiency, drainage and waste disposal, combustion appliances and fuel storage, conservation of fuel or power, and electrical safety.

Direct heating means a method of heating in which the heat source is integral with the hot water vessel. Examples are an electrical immersion heater, or a gas burner with a flue arrangement that passes through the vessel so that the flue transfers heat to the stored water, or the circulation of water from a vessel situated near a burner with a flue arrangement so that the flue transfers heat to the circulating water.

Domestic hot water means water that has been heated for cooking, food preparation, personal washing or cleaning purposes. The term is used irrespective of the type of
building in which the hot water system is installed.

*Earth-closet means a closet having a movable receptacle for the reception of faecal matter and its deodorisation by the use of earth, ashes or chemicals, or by other methods. This will therefore include chemical and composting toilets.

Exempt buildings and work means the erection of any building or extension of a kind described in regulation 9 of and Schedule 2 to the Building Regulations 2010; or the carrying out of any work to or in connection with such a building or extension, if after the carrying out of that work it is still a building or extension of a kind described in that Schedule.

Expansion vessel means a vessel to temporarily accommodate the expansion of water from the unvented hot water storage vessel as it is heated.

Greywater is domestic wastewater excluding faecal matter and urine. When appropriately treated this may replace the use of
wholesome water in
WCs, urinals, irrigation or washing machines.

Harvested rainwater means rainwater harvested from roofs or other suitable surfaces and collected and stored. When appropriately treated, this may replace the use of
wholesome water in
WCs, urinals, irrigation or washing machines.

Heated wholesome water means water that, when cold, was
wholesome in accordance with the definition below and has been subjected to a heat source to increase its temperature.

Hot water storage system means a
vessel for storing:

a. heated
wholesome hot water or
softened wholesome hot water for subsequent use

b. water that is used to heat other water together with any ancillary safety devices described in paragraphs 3.10 and 3.11 of this Approved Document and all other applicable operating devices.

Hot water storage system package means a
hot water storage system having the safety devices described in 3.10 and 3.17 of this Approved Document factory-fitted by the manufacturer, together with a kit containing other applicable devices supplied by the manufacturer to be fitted by the installer.

Hot water storage system unit means a hot water storage system having the safety devices described in 3.10 and 3.17 of this Approved Document and all other applicable operating devices factory-fitted by the manufacturer.

Indirect heating means a method of heating stored water through a heat exchanger.

Kitchen means a room or part of a room which contains a
sink and food preparation facilities

Material alteration means an alteration which results in a
building or a
controlled service or fitting not complying with, or being more unsatisfactory than it was before in relation to Schedule 1 requirements in relation to structure, means of warning and escape, internal and external fire spread, fire service access and facilities, and access and use.

Non-self-resetting energy cut-out means a device that will interrupt the supply of heat to a hot water storage vessel when a fixed (factory set) temperature is exceeded. If this protective device is actuated it should only be possible to reset it manually.

Preparation of food means handling, making and cooking of food.

Pressure relief valve means a mechanically operated valve that opens to discharge water when a fixed (factory set) pressure is exceeded.

Primary thermal store means a store of heat energy that can be used to heat
domestic hot water by means of a heat exchanger. The thermal store can be heated by a variety of heat sources. Primary hot water thermal stores can be either vented or unvented.

Risk assessment for the purposes of this document means the identification of the hazards associated with a process or activity combined with an assessment of the probability and consequences of each hazard.

*Room for residential purposes means a room, or a suite of rooms, which is not a dwelling- house or a flat and which is used by one or more persons to live and sleep in, and includes a room in a hostel, a hotel, a boarding house, a hall of residence or a residential home, but does not include a room in a hospital, or other similar establishment, used for patient accommodation.

Sanitary accommodation means a room containing a
WC or
urinal, whether or not it also contains other sanitary appliances.
Sanitary accommodation containing one or more cubicles counts as a single space if there is free circulation of air throughout the space.

Sanitary appliance means
WC,
urinal, bath, shower, washbasin,
sink, bidet and drinking fountain. It also includes appliances that are not connected to a water supply (e.g. composting toilet) or drain (e.g. waterless
urinal).

*Sanitary convenience means closets and
urinals.

Sink means a receptacle used for holding water (for
preparation of food or washing up) supplied through a tap and having a wastepipe.

*Softened wholesome water means water which would be regarded as wholesome for the purposes of regulations made under section 67 of the Water Industry Act 1991 (standards of wholesomeness) as they apply for the purposes of Part G of Schedule 1 in accordance with paragraph (2c) but for the presence of sodium in excess of the level specified in those regulations if it is caused by a water softener or water softening process which reduces the concentrations of calcium and magnesium.

Tundish means a device, installed in the discharge pipe from a valve, that provides an air break allowing discharge to be conducted safely to a place of termination. The tundish also provides a visible indication of a discharge and functions as backflow prevention device.

Temperature relief valve means a mechanically operated valve that opens to discharge water when a fixed (factory set) temperature is exceeded.

Unvented (closed) hot water storage system means a vessel fed with cold water from a supply pipe or dedicated storage cistern (without a vent pipe) and in which water is heated directly or indirectly. Expansion of the water when it is heated is accommodated either internally or externally and the system is fitted with safety devices to prevent water temperatures exceeding 100˚C, and other applicable operating devices to control primary flow, prevent backflow, control working pressure and accommodate expansion.

Urinal means an appliance used for reception and disposal of urine.

Vented (open) hot water storage system means a vessel fed with cold water from a dedicated storage cistern. Expansion of the water when it is heated is accommodated through the cold feed pipe. A vent pipe connecting the top of the vessel to a point open to the atmosphere above the cold water storage cistern is provided as a safety device.

*Water-closet (WC) means a closet that has a separate fixed receptacle connected to a drainage system and separate provision for flushing from a supply of clean water either by the operation of a mechanism or by automatic action. Water-closets are also referred to as WCs.

Wholesome water means water complying with the requirements of regulations made under Section 67 (Standards of wholesomeness) of the Water Industry Act 1991. The regulations made under this Section at the time of publication of this Approved Document are for England the Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101), for Wales the Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations (SI 2010/66) and, for England, the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/3184 as amended), and, for Wales, the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2001 (SI 2001/3911 as amended).

Types of work covered by this Approved Document

Building work

Building work, as defined in regulation 3 of the Building Regulations 2010, includes the erection and extension of a building, the provision or extension of a controlled service or fitting, and the material alteration of a building or a controlled service or fitting. In addition, Building Regulations may apply in cases where the purposes for which or the manner or circumstances in which a building or part of a building is used change in a way that constitutes a material change of use.

Under regulation 4 of the Building Regulations 2010, building work should be carried out in such a way that, on completion of work,

i. the building complies with the applicable Parts of Schedule 1 of the Building Regulations,

ii. in the case of an extension or material alteration of a building, or the provision, extension or material alteration of a controlled service or fitting, where it did not comply with any such requirement, it is no more unsatisfactory in relation to that requirement than before the work was carried out.

Work described in Part G concerns the provision or extension of controlled services or fittings. Work associated with installations covered in these sections may be subject to other relevant Parts of the Building Regulations.

Material change of use

A material change of use occurs in specified circumstances in which a building or part of a building that was previously used for one purpose will be used in future for another. Where there is a material change of use the Building Regulations set requirements that must be met before the building can be used for its new purpose.

Regulation 5 of the Building Regulations specifies the following circumstances as material changes of use:

a building is used as a dwelling where previously it was not

a building contains a flat where previously it did not

a building is used as an hotel or boarding house where previously it was not.

a building is used as an institution where previously it was not

a building is used as a public building where previously it was not

a building no longer comes within the exemptions in Schedule 2 to the Building Regulations where previously it did

a building which contains at least one dwelling contains a greater or lesser number of dwellings than it did previously

a building contains a room for residential purposes where previously it did not

a building which contains at least one room for residential purposes contains a greater or lesser number of such rooms than it did previously

a building is used as a shop where previously it was not

Parts G1, G3(1) to (3) and G4 to G6 will apply to all the material changes of use mentioned above. This means that whenever such changes occur the building must be brought up to the standards required by Parts G1 and G3 to G6

Parts G2, G3(4) and regulation 36 will apply only to material changes of use where a building is used as a dwelling where previously it was not and where a building contains a flat where previously it did not.

Historic buildings

The types of building work covered by this Approved Document may include work on historic buildings. Historic buildings include:

a. listed buildings

b. buildings situated in designated conservation areas

c. buildings which are of architectural or historic interest and which are referred to as a material consideration in a local authority’s development plan

d. buildings of architectural and historical interest within national parks, areas of outstanding or natural beauty and world heritage sites.

Special considerations may apply if the building on which the work is to be carried out has special historic or architectural value, and compliance with the sanitation or hot water safety requirements would unacceptably alter the character or appearance of the building or parts of it.

When undertaking work on or in connection with buildings with special historic or architectural value, the aim should be to improve sanitation and hot water safety where and to the extent that it is possible provided that the work does not prejudice the character of the host building or increase the risk of long-term deterioration to the building’s fabric or fittings.

In arriving at a balance between historic building conservation and sanitation or hot water safety requirements, it would be appropriate to take into account the advice of the local authority’s conservation officer before work begins.

Guidance is also available in the English Heritage publication Building Regulations and Historic Buildings, 2002 (revised 2004), which is available at
www.english-heritage.org.uk.

Note: Any building in the schedule of monuments maintained under section 1 of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 is exempt from all Building Regulations requirements including those in Part G.

Notification of work

In almost all cases of new building work it will be necessary to notify a BCB in advance of any work starting. There are two exceptions to this: where work is carried out under a self- certification scheme listed in Schedule 3, and where work is listed in Schedule 4 to the Building Regulations as being not notifiable.

Competent person self-certification schemes under Schedule 3

Under regulation 12(6) of the Building Regulations it is not necessary to notify a BCB in advance of work which is covered by this Approved Document if that work is of a type set out in column 1 of Schedule 3 to the Regulations and is carried out by a person registered with a relevant self-certification (competent persons) scheme as set out in column 2 of that Schedule. In order to join such a scheme a person must demonstrate competence to carry out the type of work the scheme covers, and also the ability to comply with all relevant requirements in the Building Regulations. Details of current schemes including those relating to sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency can be found in Annex 2 of Approved Document G and from
www.communities.gov.uk. These schemes may change from time to time, or schemes may change name, or new schemes may be authorised; the current list on the Communities and Local Government website should always be consulted. Full details of the schemes can be found on the individual scheme websites.

Where work is carried out by a person registered with a competent person scheme, regulation 20 of the Building Regulations and regulation 20(1) of the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010 require that the occupier of the building be given, within 30 days of the completion of the work, a certificate confirming that the work complies with all applicable Building Regulation requirements. There is also a requirement that the BCB be given a notice that this has been done, or a copy of the certificate, again within 30 days of the completion of the work. These certificates and notices are usually made available through the scheme operator.

BCBs are authorised to accept these certificates as evidence of compliance with the requirements of the Building Regulations. However, local authority inspection and enforcement powers remain unaffected, although they are normally used only in response to a complaint that work does not comply.

Work which is not notifiable under Schedule 4

Schedule 4 to the Building Regulations sets out types of work where there is no requirement to notify a BCB that work is to be carried out. These types of work are mainly of a minor nature where there is no significant risk to health, safety, water efficiency or energy efficiency. Health, safety, water efficiency and energy efficiency requirements continue to apply to these types of work; only the need to notify a BCB has been removed.

Where only non-notifiable work as set out in Schedule 4 is carried out, there is no requirement for a certificate confirming that the work complies with Building Regulation requirements to be given to the occupier or the BCB.

The types of non-notifiable work in Schedule 4 relevant to the sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency provisions of the Regulations are:

i. in an existing hot water system, the replacement of any part which is not a combustion appliance, or the addition of an output device or control device. The work will however remain notifiable where commissioning is possible, and will affect the reasonable use of fuel and power. This is most likely to be where water heaters are being provided

ii. the installation of a stand-alone, self-contained fixed hot water appliance. This is restricted to a single appliance and any associated controls and must not be connected to, or form part of, any other fixed building service. However, if any of the following apply, the work will remain notifiable building work:

– the service is a combustion appliance

any electrical work associated with the installation is notifiable

commissioning is possible and would affect the service’s energy efficiency, such as that of water heaters

iii. the replacement of a sanitary convenience with one that uses no more water than the one it replaces, a washbasin, sink, bidet, fixed bath, or a shower but only where the work does not include any work to:

underground drainage

the hot or cold water system or above- ground drainage which could prejudice the health and safety of any person on completion of work

iv. replacing any part or adding an output or control device to an existing cold water supply

v. providing a
hot water storage system that has a storage vessel with a capacity not exceeding 15 litres provided that any electrical work associated with the installation is also not notifiable.

Schedule 4 also sets out what types of electrical installation work in dwellings is non-notifiable. Full information on this is given in Approved Document P.

Exemptions

Schedule 2 to the Building Regulations sets out a number of classes of buildings which are exempt from all Building Regulations requirements. However, the exemption has been removed in respect of some requirements of Part G where hot or cold water supply systems are shared with other buildings. This is to help ensure that the whole hot or cold water system is safe.

In particular:

i. the requirements of Parts G 1, G3(2) and G3(3) will apply to any greenhouse which receives ahot or cold water supply from a source shared with or located inside a dwelling

ii. the requirements of Parts G1, G3(2) and G3(3) will apply to any small detached building falling within Class 6 of Schedule 2 and any extension falling within Class 7 of Schedule 2 (which includes conservatories under 30m2 in area) which receives a hot or cold water supply shared with or located inside any building that is subject to the Regulations.

Please note that the Regulations do not require the provision of hot or cold water systems to such exempt buildings, but if such systems are provided they must meet the minimum hygiene and safety requirements in those Parts.

All other Classes of buildings within Schedule 2 retain their exemption from compliance with Part G.

Materials and workmanship

Any building work within the meaning of the Building Regulations should, in accordance with regulation 7, be carried out with proper materials and in a workmanlike manner.

You may show that you have complied with regulation 7 in a number of ways. These include the appropriate use of a product bearing CE marking in accordance with the Construction Products Directive (89/106/EEC) as amended by the CE Marking Directive (93/68/EEC)1 or a product complying with an appropriate technical specification (as defined in those Directives), a British Standard or an alternative national technical specification of any state which is a contracting party to the European Economic Area which in use is equivalent, or a product covered by a national or European certificate issued by a European Technical Approval issuing body, and the conditions of use are in accordance with the terms of the certificate.

You will find further guidance in the Approved Document supporting regulation 7 on materials and workmanship.

Supplementary guidance

The Department of Communities and Local Government occasionally issues additional material to aid interpretation of the guidance in Approved Documents. This material may be conveyed in official letters to chief executives of local authorities and Approved Inspectors and/ or posted on the websites accessed through:
www.communities.gov.uk/planningandbuilding/ buildingregulations/.

Technical specifications

Standards and technical approvals are relevant guidance to the extent that they relate to health, safety or water efficiency considerations in the Building Regulations. They may also address other aspects of performance such as serviceability, or aspects that, although they relate to health and safety, are not covered by the Building Regulations.

When an Approved Document makes reference to a named standard, the relevant version of the standard is the one listed at the end of the publication. However, if this version of the standard has been revised or updated by the issuing standards body, the new version may be used as a source of guidance provided that it continues to address the relevant requirements of the Building Regulations. Where it is proposed to work to the new version instead of the version listed at the end of the publication, this should be discussed with the BCB in advance of any work starting.

The appropriate use of a product, which complies with a European Technical Approval as defined in the Construction Products Directive, (89/106/ EEC) should meet the relevant requirements.

Independent schemes of certification and accreditation

Much of the guidance throughout this document is given in terms of performance.

Since the performance of a system, product, component or structure is dependent upon satisfactory site installation, testing and maintenance, independent schemes of certification and accreditation of installers and maintenance firms will provide confidence in the appropriate standard of workmanship being provided.

Confidence that the required level of performance can be achieved will be demonstrated by the use of a system, material, product or structure which is provided under the arrangements of a product conformity certification scheme and an accreditation of installer scheme.

Third party accredited product conformity certification schemes not only provide a means of identifying materials and designs of systems, products and structures which have demonstrated that they reach the requisite performance, but additionally provide confidence that the systems, materials, products and structures are actually provided to the same specification or design as that tested or assessed.

Third party accreditation of installers of systems, materials, products and structures provides a means of ensuring that installations have been conducted by knowledgeable contractors to appropriate standards, thereby increasing the reliability of the anticipated performance.

Many certification bodies that approve such schemes are accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service.

BCBs may accept certification of products, components, materials or structures under such schemes as evidence of compliance with the relevant standard. Similarly BCBs may accept the certification of installation or maintenance of products, components, materials and structures under such schemes as evidence of compliance with the relevant standard. Nonetheless a BCB will wish to establish in advance of the work, that any such scheme is adequate for the purpose of the Building Regulations

Interaction with other legislation

This Approved Document makes reference to other legislation, including those listed below, that may also need to be considered.

Note: All statutory instruments can be accessed at
www.opsi.gov.uk.

The Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/3184 as amended), and in Wales
The Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2001 (SI 2001/3911 as amended) are made under the Water Industry Act 1991 and apply to the supply of water by a statutory water undertaker or a licensed water supplier. They make provision for the wholesomeness of water supplied for such domestic purposes as consist in or include cooking, drinking, food preparation or washing; or to premises in which food is produced.

The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148 as amended) are made under the Water Industry Act 1991 and apply to any water fitting installed or used, or to be installed or used, in premises to which water is or is to be supplied by a water undertaker. They make provision for preventing contamination, waste, misuse, undue consumption and erroneous measurement of water supplied by a statutory water undertaker or licensed water supplier.

The Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101) in England and The
Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/66) in Wales are made under the Water Industry Act 1991 and section 2(2) of the European Communications Act 1972 and are concerned with the quality of water supplied from private supplies for drinking, washing or cooking or for food preparation purposes.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (SI 1992/3004 as amended) are made under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and apply to any workplace or part of a workplace. They apply to the common parts of flats and similar buildings if people such as cleaners, wardens and caretakers are employed to work in these common parts. They make provision for, amongst other matters, space requirements, cleaning and provision of sanitary conveniences.
Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/14 as amended) and the
Food Hygiene (Wales) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/31 W5 as amended) are made under European Communities Act 1972 and apply to measures relating to food (including drink) including the primary production of food. The provision of washbasins and sinks is relevant to Approved Document G.

Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations (SI 1998/2451) extend to all dangers arising from the transmission, distribution, supply or use of gas conveyed from a gas storage vessel. The installation of gas heated water systems is relevant to Approved Document G.

G1 COLD WATER SUPPLY

The Requirement G1

This Approved Document deals with the following Requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

Cold water supply

G1. (1) There must be a suitable installation for the provision of: (a) wholesome water to any place where drinking water is drawn off;

(b) wholesome water or softened wholesome water to any washbasin or bidet provided in or adjacent to a room containing a sanitary convenience;

(c) wholesome water or softened wholesome water to any washbasin, bidet, fixed bath or shower in a bathroom; and

(d) wholesome water to any sink provided in any area where food is prepared.

(2) There must be a suitable installation for the provision of water of suitable quality to any sanitary convenience fitted with a flushing device.

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement

G1(1) will be met if:

a. the water supplied is wholesome;

b. the pressure and flow rate is sufficient for the operation of
sanitary appliances planned in the
building;

c. the supply is reliable; and

d. the installation conveys
wholesome water or
softened wholesome water to the sanitary appliances and locations specified in the Requirement without waste, misuse, undue consumption or contamination of water.

The water will be wholesome if it is provided:

a. by a statutory water undertaker or a licensed water supplier; or

b. by a source complying with the Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101) in England or the Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations (SI 2010/66) in Wales. In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement

G1(2) will be met if:

a. the water supplied is either wholesome, softened wholesome or of suitable quality having regard to the risks to health;

b. the pressure and flow rate is sufficient for the operation of the
sanitary appliances;

c. the supply is reliable; and

d. the installation conveys water to sanitary appliances and locations specified in the Requirement without waste, misuse, undue consumption or contamination of
wholesome water.

Wholesome water

1.1 Water supplied to the
building by a statutory water undertaker or a licensed water supplier through an installation complying with the requirements of the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148 as amended) may be assumed to be
wholesome water. The requirements in the appropriate water quality regulations are set out for ease of reference in Annex 1 to this Approved Document.

1.2 Attention is drawn to the requirements of the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148 as amended) which make provision for preventing contamination, waste, misuse, undue consumption and erroneous measurement of water supplied by a water undertaker or licensed water supplier.

1.3 Where a
building is supplied with water from a source other than a water undertaker or licensed water supplier, the water shall be considered to be wholesome if it meets the criteria set out in the Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101) in England or the Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations (SI 2010/66) in Wales. The requirements in those regulations are set out for ease of reference in Annex 1 to this Approved Document.

Softened wholesome water

1.4 Wholesome water which has been treated by a water softener or a water softening processes to adjust the content of hardness minerals may have raised levels of sodium. Where the water, after this treatment, still complies with the requirements for wholesome water it is still considered to be wholesome water.

1.5 However, where it complies with all requirements for wholesome water other than its sodium content, it will be considered to be wholesome softened water. Whilst wholesome softened water may be considered suitable for most purposes it should not be provided in place of wholesome water to any place where drinking water is drawn off or to any sink provided in an area where food is prepared

Alternative sources of water

1.6 Water treated to the high standards of
wholesome water is not essential for all of the uses that water is put to in and about
buildings, e.g. toilet flushing, irrigation. A variety of alternative sources are available for water. These include:

a. water abstracted from wells, springs, bore- holes or water courses;

b.
harvested rainwater;

c. reclaimed
greywater; and

d. reclaimed industrial process water.

1.7 The design of treatment systems for water from alternative sources should incorporate measures to minimise the impact on water quality of:

a. failure of any components;

b. failure to undertake any necessary maintenance;

c. power failure where appropriate; and d. any other measures identified in a risk assessment.

1.8 Guidance on the marking of pipework conveying water from alternative sources can be found in the WRAS Information & Guidance Note No. 9-02-05 Marking and identification of pipework for reclaimed (greywater) systems and in BS 8515:2009 Rainwater harvesting systems – Code of Practice.

1.9 Guidance on installing, modifying and maintaining reclaimed water systems can be found in the WRAS Information and Guidance Note No. 9-02-04 Reclaimed water systems and in BS 8515:2009 Rainwater harvesting systems. Code of practice.

1.10 Information on the technical and economic feasibility of rainwater and
greywater can found in MTP (2007) Rainwater and greywater: technical and economic feasibility.

1.11 Information on the specification of rainwater and
greywater systems can be found in MTP (2007) Rainwater and greywater: a guide for specifiers.

1.12 Guidelines for rainwater and
greywater systems, in relation to water quality standards, can be found in MTP (2007) Rainwater and greywater: review of water quality standards alternative and recommendations for the UK.

1.13 Water from alternative sources may be used in dwellings for
sanitary conveniences, washing machines and irrigation, provided the appropriate
risk assessment has been carried out. A risk assessment should ensure that the supply is appropriate to the situation in respect of the source of the water and the treatment of it, and not likely to cause waste, misuse, undue consumption or contamination of
wholesome water.

1.14 Any system/unit used to supply dwellings with water from alternative sources should be subject to a risk assessment by the system designer and manufacturer, and appropriate testing carried out to demonstrate that any risks have been suitably addressed. A risk assessment should include consideration of the effect on water quality of system failure and failure to carry out necessary maintenance.

G2 WATER EFFICIENCY

The Requirement G2 and Regulation 36

This Approved Document deals with the following Requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 and regulation 36 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

Water efficiency

G2. Reasonable provision must be made by the installation of fittings and fixed appliances that use water efficiently for the prevention of undue consumption of water.

Water efficiency of new dwellings

36.—(1) The potential consumption of wholesome water by persons occupying a dwelling to which this regulation applies must not exceed 125 litres per person per day, calculated in accordance with the methodology set out in the document “The Water Efficiency Calculator for New Dwellings”, published in September 2009 by the DCLG*.

(2) This regulation applies to a dwelling which is— (a) erected; or (b) formed by a material change of use of a building within the meaning of regulation 5(a) or (b).

Wholesome water consumption calculation

37.—(1) Where regulation 36 applies, the person carrying out the work must give the local authority a notice which specifies the potential consumption of wholesome water per person per day calculated in accordance with the methodology referred to in that regulation in relation to the completed dwelling.

(2) The notice shall be given to the local authority not later than five days after the work has been completed.

Building (Approved Inspectors) Regulations 2010

Application of Provisions of the Principal Regulations

20.—(1) Regulation 20 (provisions applicable to self-certification schemes), 27 (CO
2 emmission rate calculations),

29 (energy performance certificates), 37 (wholesome water consumption calculation), 41 (sound insulation testing), 42 (mechanical ventilation air flow rate testing), 43 (pressure testing) and 44 (commissioning) of the Principal Regulations apply in relation to building work which is the subject of an initial notice as if references to the local authority were references to the approved inspector.

(4) Regulation 37(2) of the Principal Regulations applies in relation to building work which is the subject of an initial notice as if after “work has been completed” there were inserted, “or, if earlier the date on which in accordance with regulation 17 of the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010 the initial notice ceases to be in force”.

Requirement G2 applies only when a dwelling is— (a) erected; or (b) formed by a material change of use of a building within the meaning of regulation 5(a) or (b).

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G2 will be met for new dwellings if:

a. the estimated consumption of wholesome water resulting from the design of cold and hot water systems (calculated in accordance with the guidance set out in this Approved Document and taking into account the use of any alternative sources of water provided in accordance with G1(2)) is not greater than the standard set by the Secretary of State of 125 litres/head/day of
wholesome water;

b. the manner in which
sanitary appliances and white goods used in the design calculation undertaken to demonstrate compliance with paragraph (a) are provided and installed in the dwelling takes account of the other provisions in this Approved Document;

c. the manner in which any alternative sources of water used in the design calculation undertaken to demonstrate compliance with paragraph (a) are supplied to the dwelling, takes account of other provisions in this Approved Document;

d. a record of the
sanitary appliances and white goods used in the water consumption calculation and installed in the dwelling is provided along with sufficient other information enabling
building owners or occupiers to maintain the
building and its services so as to maintain the water efficiency of the
building. In this context, relevant white goods are washing machines and dishwashers;

e. a record of the alternative sources of water used in the water consumption calculation and supplied to the dwelling is provided along with sufficient other information enabling
building owners or occupiers to maintain the
building and its services so as to maintain the water efficiency of the
building.

Where a
building consists of more than one dwelling (such as a block of flats) it should be designed so that the estimated consumption of wholesome water resulting from the design of the cold and hot water systems for each individual dwelling should be no greater than the target.

Where it can be demonstrated that a dwelling meets the minimum water efficiency standard in the Code for Sustainable Homes, the dwelling may be presumed to meet requirement G2.

General

2.1 The water used by
sanitary appliances and relevant white goods in a new dwelling should be calculated using the manufacturer’s declared value for water consumption of each of those appliances and white goods.

2.2 The estimated water consumption of a new dwelling should be calculated in accordance with the methodology set out in the “Water Efficiency Calculator for New Dwellings”.

2.3 The estimated consumption of
wholesome water of a new dwelling should be not more than 125 litres/head/day (l/h/d). This includes a fixed factor of water for outdoor use of 5 l/h/d.

2.4 Where alternative sources of water are to be used in the dwelling design, this should be reflected in the estimate of water use.

Notification of water efficiency calculation to the BCB

Where regulation 36 applies, regulation 37 of the Building Regulations (where the BCB is the local authority) and regulation 20(1) and (4) of the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations respectively require that a notice specifying the calculated potential consumption of
wholesome water per person per day relating to the dwelling as constructed be given to the appropriate
BCB.

In most cases, this notice must be given to the
BCB not later than five days after the completion of the
building work. However, where the
BCB is an Approved Inspector and the dwelling is occupied before completion, the notice must be given not later than the day that the initial notice ceases to be in force in consequence of regulation 18 of the Building (Approved Inspectors etc) Regulations when this is earlier than five days after the completion of the work.

It is permissible for the notice to be served on the
BCB electronically provided the
BCB has stated its willingness to receive the document by those means and it is delivered to the electronic address that the body has specified.

Local authorities are unlikely to be able to give a completion certificate for the building until the notice required under regulation 37 of the Building Regulations has been received. Approved Inspectors are unlikely to be able to give a final certificate until the equivalent notice under regulation 20(1) and (4) of the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations has been received.

G3 HOT WATER SUPPLY AND SYSTEMS

The Requirement G3

This Approved Document deals with the following Requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

G3. (1) There must be a suitable installation for the provision of heated wholesome water or heated softened wholesome water to:

(a) any washbasin or bidet provided in or adjacent to a room containing a sanitary convenience;

(b) any washbasin, bidet, fixed bath and shower in a bathroom; and

(c) any sink provided in any area where food is prepared. (2) A hot water system, including any cistern or other vessel that supplies water to or receives expansion water from a hot water system, shall be designed, constructed and installed so as to resist the effects of temperature and pressure that may occur either in normal use or in the event of such malfunctions as may reasonably be anticipated, and must be adequately supported.

(3) A hot water system that has a hot water storage vessel shall incorporate precautions to:

(a) prevent the temperature of the water stored in the vessel at any time exceeding 100˚C; and

(b) ensure that any discharge from safety devices is safely conveyed to where it is visible but will not cause a danger to persons in or about the building.

(4) The hot water supply to any fixed bath must be so designed and installed as to incorporate measures to ensure that the temperature of the water that can be delivered to that bath does not exceed 48˚C.

Requirement G3(3) does not apply to a system which heats or stores water for the purposes only of an industrial process.

Requirement G3(4) applies only when a dwelling is— (a) erected; (b) formed by a material change of use within the meaning of regulation 5(a) or (b).

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G3(1) will be met if:

a. the installation conveys hot water to the
sanitary appliances and locations specified in the requirement without waste, misuse or undue consumption of water; and

b. the water supplied is
heated wholesome water or heated softened water.

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G3(2) will be met if all components of the hot water system including any cistern that supplies water to, or receives expansion water from the hot water system continues to safely contain the hot water:

a. during normal operation of the hot water system;

b. following failure of any thermostat used to control temperature; and

c. during operation of any of the safety devices fitted in accordance with paragraph G3(3).

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G3(3) will be met for a
hot water storage system that has a vented storage vessel if:

a. the storage vessel has a suitable vent pipe connecting the top of the vessel to a point open to the atmosphere above the level of the water in the cold water storage cistern and over it; and,

b. in addition to any thermostat, either the heat source, or the storage vessel is fitted with a device that will prevent the temperature of the stored water at any time exceeding 100˚C; and

c. the hot water system has pipework that incorporates a provision for the discharge of hot water from the safety devices to an appropriate place open to the atmosphere where it will cause no danger to persons in or about the
building.

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G3(3) will be met for a hot water system that has an unvented storage vessel if:

a. the storage vessel has at least two independent safety devices such as those that release pressure and so prevent the temperature of the stored water at any time exceeding 100˚C in addition to any thermostat; and

b. the hot water system has pipework that incorporates a provision for the discharge of hot water from safety devices to be visible at some point and safely conveys it to an appropriate place open to the atmosphere where it will cause no danger to persons in or about the building.

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G3(4) will be met if:

the hot water outlet temperature is appropriate for the appliance being served, and any device to limit the maximum temperature that can be supplied at the outlet can not be easily altered by
building users.

General

3.1 The delivered hot water can be considered as
heated wholesome water or heated softened wholesome water where:

a. the cold water supply to the hot water system is wholesome or softened wholesome; and

b. the installation complies with the requirements of the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148 as amended).

3.2 The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations make provision for preventing contamination, waste, misuse, undue consumption and erroneous measurement of water supplied by a water undertaker or licensed water supplier. Guidance on the application of the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations can be found in the Water Regulations Guide published by the Water Regulations Advisory Scheme.

3.3 Attention is also drawn to the requirements of the Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994/1886) for all gas installation work.

3.4 Electrical work associated with hot water systems should be carried out in accordance with BS7671:2008 Requirements for electrical installations (IEE Wiring Regulations 17th Edition).

3.5 For installations in dwellings and associated
buildings, attention is drawn to Building Regulations 2000 Schedule 1 Part P (Electrical safety – Dwellings) and to Approved Document P.

3.6 For workplaces and premises controlled in connection with a trade, business or other undertaking, attention is also drawn to the HSC publication Legionnaires’ Disease: Control of Legionella Bacteria in Water Systems. Approved code of practice and guidance. L8, Health and Safety Commission 2000. ISBN 0 7176 1772 6.

3.7 Pipework should be designed and installed in such a way as to minimise the transfer time between the
hot water storage system and hot water outlets.

3.8 The safety requirements for hot water systems used solely for supplying water for industrial processes is contained in the Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/128) and further guidance is available in Safety of pressure systems. Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000. Approved Code of Practice L122 HSE Books 2000. ISBN 0 7176 1767 X.

Provision of hot water supply

3.9 The Requirement G3 only requires the provision of a hot water supply to:

a. any washbasin provided in association with a sanitary convenience in accordance with G4(2);

b. any washbasin, bidet, fixed bath or shower in a bathroom in a dwelling or provided for rooms for residential purposes, provided in accordance with G5;

c. any
sink in a food preparation area, provided in accordance with G6.

There is no requirement under the Building Regulations to provide hot water to other washing facilities, but there may be such requirements under other legislation (see paragraphs 4.3, 4.4 and 6.4).

Design and installation of directly or indirectly heated hot water storage systems

General

3.10 Hot water storage systems should be designed and installed in accordance with BS 6700:2006 + A1:2009 Specification for design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages or BS EN 12897:2006 Water supply. Specification for indirectly heated unvented (closed) storage water heaters.

3.11 Hot water storage vessels should conform to BS 853-1:1996 Specification for vessels for use in heating systems. Calorifiers and storage vessels for central heating and hot water supply, BS 1566- 1:2002 Copper indirect cylinders for domestic purposes. Open vented copper cylinders. Requirements and test methods, or BS 3198:1981 Specification for copper hot water storage combination units for domestic purposes or other relevant national standards as appropriate.

Vented hot water storage systems

3.12 Vented
hot water storage systems should incorporate a vent pipe of an adequate size, but not less than 19mm internal diameter, connecting the top of the hot water storage vessel to a point open to the atmosphere above and over the level of the water in the cold water storage cistern. 3.13 In addition to the vent pipe referred to in 3.12 and any thermostat provided to control the temperature of the stored water to a desired temperature, vented
hot water storage systems should incorporate either:

a. for all direct heat sources, a non-self-resetting energy cut-out to disconnect the supply of heat to the storage vessel in the event of the storage system overheating; and, for all indirect heat sources, an overheat

cut-out to disconnect the supply of heat to the storage vessel in the event of the stored water overheating so that the temperature of the stored water does not exceed 100°C; or

b. an appropriate safety device, for example, a
temperature relief valve or a
combined temperature and pressure relief valve to safely discharge the water in the event of significant over heating.

3.14 Vent pipes should discharge over a cold water storage cistern conforming to BS 417- 2:1987 Specification for galvanized low carbon steel cisterns, cistern lids, tanks and cylinders. Metric units; or BS 4213:2004 Cisterns for domestic use. Cold water storage and combined feed and expansion (thermoplastic) cisterns up to 500 litres. Specification; as appropriate.

3.15 The cold water storage cistern into which the vent pipe discharges should be supported on a flat, level, rigid platform which is capable of safely withstanding the weight of the cistern when filled with water to the rim and fully supporting the bottom of the cistern over the whole of its area. The platform should extend a minimum of 150mm in all directions beyond the edge of the maximum dimensions of the cistern.

Note: Where an existing metal cistern is replaced, or a plastic cistern is replaced by one with larger dimensions, the existing support should be upgraded, as necessary, with one in accordance with paragraph 3.15.

3.16 The cistern should be accessible for maintenance, cleaning and replacement.

Unvented hot water storage systems – all systems

3.17 To minimize the danger from excessive pressure, unvented hot water storage systems should incorporate a minimum of two independent safety devices. These shall be in addition to any thermostat provided to control the desired temperature of the stored water. The selection of safety devices should take account of the physical location of the devices, and the design, configuration, location of components and performance characteristics of the system to which they are attached.

3.18 An acceptable approach might consist of:

a. a non self-resetting energy cut-out to disconnect the supply of heat to the storage vessel in the event of the storage system over-heating; and

b. a temperature relief valve or a combined temperature and pressure relief valve to safely discharge the water in the event of serious over-heating.

Alternative approaches to this are acceptable provided that they provide an equivalent degree of safety.

Note: See 3.35 for suitability of devices for primary thermal stores

3.19 Water heaters with a capacity of 15 litres or less that have appropriate safety devices for temperature and pressure will generally satisfy the requirement set out in G3(3).

Unvented hot water storage systems – systems up to 500 litres capacity and 45kW power input

3.20 Paragraphs 3.21 to 3.24 are in addition to the provisions of 3.17 above.

3.21 If an indirect supply of heat to an unvented
hot water storage system incorporates a boiler, the energy cut-out may be on the boiler.

3.22 Any unvented
hot water storage system up to 500 litres and less than 45kW should be in the form of a proprietary
hot water storage system unit or package. The package and components should be appropriate to the circumstances in which they are used and should satisfy an appropriate standard that will ensure the requirements of regulation G3(2) and G3(3) will be met (e.g. BS EN 12897:2006 Water Supply. Specification for indirectly heated unvented (closed) hot water storage systems or BS 6700:2006 + A1:2009 Design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages).

3.23 Any unvented hot water storage system unit or package should be indelibly marked with the following information:

a. the manufacturer’s name and contact details;

b. a model reference;

c. the rated storage capacity of the storage water heater;

d. the operating pressure of the system and the operating pressure of the expansion valve;

e. relevant operating data on each of the safety devices fitted; and

f. the maximum primary circuit pressure and flow temperature of indirect hot water storage system units or packages.

3.24 In addition, the following warning should be indelibly marked on the hot water storage system unit or package so that it is visible after installation:

WARNING TO USER

a. Do not remove or adjust any component part of this unvented water heater; contact the installer.

b. If this unvented water heater develops a fault, such as a flow of hot water from the discharge pipe, switch the heater off and contact the installer.

WARNING TO INSTALLER

a. This installation is subject to the Building Regulations.

b. Use only appropriate components for installation or maintenance. Installed by:

Name …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Address …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Tel. No. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Completion date ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Unvented hot water storage systems – systems over 500 litres capacity or over 45kW power input

3.25 Paragraph 3.26 and 3.27 are in addition to the provisions of 3.17 above.

3.26 Systems over 500 litres capacity will generally be bespoke designs for specific projects and as such are inappropriate for approval by a third party accredited product conformity certification scheme. Where this is the case, the unvented
hot water storage system should be designed to the safety requirements in 3.17 by an appropriately qualified engineer.

3.27 Any unvented
hot water storage system having a power input of more than 45kW, but a capacity of 500 litres or less should be in the form of a proprietary hot water storage system unit or package. The package and components should be appropriate to the circumstances in which they are used and should satisfy an appropriate standard that will ensure the requirement of regulation G3(2) and G3(3) will be met (e.g. BS EN 12897:2006 Water Supply. Specification for indirectly heated unvented (closed)
hot water storage systems or BS 6700:2006 + A1:2009 Design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages).

Safety devices

Non-self-resetting energy cut-outs

3.28 Non-self-resetting energy cut-outs may only be used where they would have the effect of instantly disconnecting the supply of energy to the storage vessel.

3.29 Non-self-resetting energy cut-outs should conform to:

a. BS EN 60335-2-73:2003 Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances. Particular requirements. Fixed immersion heaters and BS EN 60730-2-9:2002 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. Particular requirements for temperature sensing control; or

b. BS EN 257:1992 Mechanical thermostats for gas-burning appliances.

3.30 Where a non self-resetting energy cut- out operates indirectly on another device (see paragraph 3.18) to interrupt the supply of heat (e.g. it is wired up to a motorised valve or some other suitable device to shut off the flow to the primary heater), the energy cut-out should comply with the relevant European Standard (see paragraph 3.29) or the supplier or installer should be able to demonstrate that the device has equivalent performance to that set out in relevant standards.

3.31 Where an electrical device is connected to the energy cut-out, such as a relay or motorised valve, the device should operate to interrupt thesupply of energy if the electrical power supply is disconnected

.

3.32 Where there is more than one energy cut- out (see paragraph 3.35), each non-self-resetting energy cut-out should be independent (e.g. each should have a separate motorised valve and a separate temperature sensor).

3.33 Where an energy cut-out is fitted as set out in paragraphs 3.13 a) or 3.18, each heat source should have a separate non self-resetting energy cut-out.

Temperature and pressure relief devices

3.34 Where relevant, appropriate pressure, temperature or temperature and pressure- activated safety devices should be fitted in addition to a safety device such as an energy cut-out.

3.35 Temperature relief valves and
combined temperature and pressure relief valves should not be used in systems which have no provision to automatically replenish the stored water (e.g. unvented primary thermal storage vessels). In such cases there should be a second non-self- resetting energy cut-out independent of the one provided in accordance with paragraph 3.18(a).

3.36 Temperature relief valves should conform to relevant national standards such as BS 6283– 2:1991 Safety and control devices for use in hot water systems. Specifications for temperature relief valves for pressures from 1 bar to 10 bar.
Combined temperature and pressure relief valves should conform to BS EN 1490:2000 Building valves. Combined temperature and pressure relief valves. Tests and Requirements.

3.37
Temperature relief valves (see paragraph 3.18) should be sized to give a discharge rating at least equal to the total power input to the hot water storage system, when measured in accordance with Appendix F of BS 6283-2:1991 or BS EN 1490:2000.

3.38
Temperature relief valve(s) or
combined temperature and pressure relief valve(s) (see paragraph 3.18) should be located directly on the storage vessel, such that the stored water does not exceed 100˚C.

3.39 In
hot water storage system units and packages, the
temperature relief valve(s) (see paragraph 3.18) should be:

a. factory fitted and should not be disconnected other than for replacement; and

b. not relocated in any other device or fitting installed.

3.40 The safety and performance of an unvented system is dependent on the choice of system and safety devices appropriate for the location and correct installation of the system. Building owners and occupiers should therefore take care to choose installers who have the necessary skills to carry out this work. These skills can be demonstrated for example, by registration with a competent person scheme for

this type of work or by the holding of a current registered operative skills certification card for unvented hot water systems.

3.41 The installation of an unvented system is notifiable building work which must be notified to the
BCB before work commences. The
BCB may then check to make sure the work is safe and meets current energy efficiency requirements.

3.42 If the installer is registered with a competent person scheme for the installation of unvented hot water systems it will not be necessary for the work to be notified in advance to the
BCB. Installers registered with such schemes will self-certify that the work complies with all relevant requirements in the Building Regulations and the building owner/occupier will be given a building regulations certificate of compliance which is usually issued by the competent person scheme operator.

Electric water heating

3.43 Electric fixed immersion heaters should comply with the provisions of BS EN 60335- 2-73:2003 Household and similar electrical appliances. Safety. Particular requirements for fixed immersion heaters.

3.44 Electric instantaneous water heaters should comply with the provisions of BS EN 60335-2-35:2002 Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances.

3.45 Electric storage water heaters should comply with the provisions of BS EN 60335- 2-21:2003 Household and similar electrical appliances. Safety. Particular requirements for storage water heaters.

Solar water heating

3.46 Factory-made solar water heating systems should comply with the provisions of BS EN 12976-1:2006 Thermal solar systems and components. Factory made systems. General requirements.

3.47 Other solar water heating systems should comply with the provisions of prEN/TS 12977- 1:2008 Thermal solar systems and components. Custom built systems. General requirements for solar water heaters and combi systems, or BS 5918:1989 British Standard Code of Practice for Solar heating systems for domestic hot water as appropriate. Further guidance is available in CIBSE Guide G, Public Health Engineering and CIBSE technical guide Solar Heating Design and Installation.

3.48 Where solar water heating systems are used, an additional heat source should be available.

Note: The additional heat source should be used, when necessary, to maintain the water temperature to restrict microbial growth.

3.49 As some solar hot water systems operate at elevated temperatures and pressures, and so all components should be rated to the appropriate temperatures and pressures.

Discharge pipes from safety devices

Discharge pipe D1

3.50 Safety devices such as
temperature relief valves or combined temperature and pressure relief valves (see paragraphs 3.13 or 3.18) should discharge either directly or by way of a manifold via a short length of metal pipe (D1) to a
tundish.

3.51 The diameter of discharge pipe (D1) should be not less than the nominal outlet size of the safety device, e.g.
temperature relief valve.

3.52 Where a manifold is used it should be sized to accept and discharge the total discharge from the discharge pipes connected to it.

3.53 Where valves other than a
temperature and pressure relief valve from a single unvented
hot water system discharge by way of the same manifold that is used by the safety devices, the manifold should be factory fitted as part of the
hot water storage system unit or package.

Tundish

3.54 The
tundish should be vertical, located in the same space as the unvented
hot water storage system and be fitted as close as possible to, and lower than, the safety device, with no more than 600mm of pipe between the valve outlet and the
tundish (see
Diagram 1).

Note: To comply with the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations, the tundish should incorporate a suitable air gap.

3.55 Any discharge should be visible at the
tundish. In addition, where discharges from safety devices may not be apparent, e.g. in dwellings occupied by people with impaired vision or mobility, consideration should be given to the installation of a suitable safety device to warn when discharge takes place, e.g. electronically operated.

Discharge pipe D2

3.56 The discharge pipe (D2) from the
tundish should:

a. have a vertical section of pipe at least 300mm long below the
tundish before any elbows or bends in the pipework (see
Diagram 1); and

b. be installed with a continuous fall of at least 1 in 200 thereafter.

3.57 The discharge pipe (D2) should be made of:

a. metal; or

b. other material that has been demonstrated to be capable of safely withstanding temperatures of the water discharged and is clearly and permanently marked to identify

the product and performance standard (e.g. as specified in the relevant part of BS 7291- 1:2006 Thermostatic pipes and fittings for hot and cold water for domestic purposes and heating installations in buildings. General requirements).

3.58 The discharge pipe D2 should be at least one pipe size larger than the nominal outlet size of the safety device unless its total equivalent hydraulic resistance exceeds that of a straight pipe 9m long, i.e. for discharge pipes between 9m and 18m the equivalent resistance length should be at least two sizes larger than the nominal outlet size of the safety device; between 18 and 27m at least 3 sizes larger, and so on; bends must be taken into account in calculating the flow resistance. See
Diagram 1,
Table 1 and the worked example.

Note: An alternative approach for sizing discharge pipes would be to follow Annex D, section D.2 of BS 6700:2006 + A1:2009 Specification for design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages.


Diagram 1 Typical discharge pipe arrangement

Table 1 Sizing of copper discharge pipe ‘D2′ for common temperature relief valve outlet sizes
Valve outlet size Minimum size of discharge pipe D1* Minimum size of discharge pipe D2* from tundish Maximum resistance allowed, expressed as a length of straight pipe (i.e. no elbows or bends) Resistance created by each elbow or bend
15mm 22mm

28mm

35mm
Up to 9m

Up to 18m

Up to 27m
0.8m

1.0m

1.4m
22mm 28mm

35mm

42mm
Up to 9m

Up to 18m

Up to 27m
1.0m

1.4m

1.7m
G1 28mm 35mm

42mm

54mm
Up to 9m

Up to 18m

Up to 27m
1.4m

1.7m

2.3m

*see 3.51 and 3.58 and
Diagram 1

Note: The above table is based on copper tube. Plastic pipes may be of different bore and resistance. Sizes and maximum lengths of plastic should be calculated using data prepared for the type of pipe being used.

Worked example:

The example below is for a G½ temperature relief valve with a discharge pipe (D2) having 4 No. 22mm elbows and length of 7m from the tundish to the point of discharge.

From
Table 1:

Maximum resistance allowed for a straight length of 22mm copper discharge pipe (D2) from a G½ temperature relief valve is: 9.0m Subtract the resistance for 4 No. 22mm elbows at 0.8m each = 3.2m

Therefore the maximum permitted length equates to 5.8m which, is less than the actual length of 7m therefore calculate the next largest size.

Maximum resistance allowed for a straight length of 28mm copper discharge pipe (D2) from a G½ temperature relief valve is: 18m

Subtract the resistance for 4 No. 28mm elbows at 1.0m each = 4m

Therefore the maximum permitted length equates to: 14m

As the actual length is 7m, a 28mm (D2) copper pipe will be satisfactory.

3.59 Where a single common discharge pipe serves more than one system, it should be at least one pipe size larger than the largest individual discharge pipe (D2) to be connected.

3.60 The discharge pipe should not be connected to a soil discharge stack unless it can be demonstrated that the soil discharge stack is capable of safely withstanding temperatures of the water discharged, in which case, it should:

a. contain a mechanical seal, not incorporating a water trap, which allows water into the branch pipe without allowing foul air from the drain to be ventilated through the
tundish;

b. be a separate branch pipe with no
sanitary appliances connected to it;

c. if plastic pipes are used as branch pipes carrying discharge from a safety device, they should be either polybutalene (PB) or cross- linked polyethylene (PE-X) complying with national standards such as Class S of BS 7291-2:2006 or Class S of BS 7291-3:2006 respectively; and

d. be continuously marked with a warning that no
sanitary appliances should be connected to the pipe.

1. Plastic pipes should be joined and assembled with fittings appropriate to the circumstances in which they are used as set out in BS EN ISO 1043-1:2002 Plastics. Symbols and abbreviated terms. Basic polymers and their special characteristics.

2. Where pipes cannot be connected to the stack it may be possible to route a dedicated pipe alongside or in close proximity to the discharge stack

Termination of discharge pipe

3.61 The discharge pipe (D2) from the
tundish should terminate in a safe place where there is no risk to persons in the vicinity of the discharge.

3.62 Examples of acceptable discharge arrangements are:

a. to a trapped gully with the end of the pipe below a fixed grating and above the water seal;

b. downward discharges at low level; i.e. up to 100mm above external surfaces such as car parks, hard standings, grassed areas etc. are acceptable providing that a wire cage or similar guard is positioned to prevent contact, whilst maintaining visibility; and,

c. discharges at high level: e.g. into a metal hopper and metal downpipe with the end of the discharge pipe clearly visible or onto a roof capable of withstanding high temperature discharges of water and 3 m from any plastic guttering system that would collect such discharges.

3.63 The discharge would consist of high temperature water and steam. Asphalt, roofing felt and non-metallic rainwater goods may be damaged by such discharges.

Prevention of excessive temperatures

3.64 Where the operating temperature of
domestic hot water in the storage vessel in a dwelling is capable of exceeding 80°C under normal operating conditions (a situation that may occur in vessels used as heat stores and those connected to solar heat collectors or solid fuel boilers that do not have intervening controls between the boiler and the vessel containing the hot water) the outlet from the storage vessel should be fitted with a device, such as an in-line hot water supply tempering valve in accordance with BS EN 15092:2008 Building Valves. In-line hot water tempering valves, to ensure that the temperature supplied to the domestic hot water distribution system does not exceed 60°C.

Prevention of scalding

3.65 The hot water supply temperature to a bath should be limited to a maximum of 48°C by use of an in-line blending valve or other appropriate temperature control device, with a maximum temperature stop and a suitable arrangement of pipework.

3.66 The acceptability of in-line blending valves can be demonstrated by compliance with the relevant European Standard such as BS EN 1111:1999 Sanitary tapware. Thermostatic mixing valves (PN 10). General technical specification or BS EN 1287:1999 Sanitary tapware. Low pressure thermostatic mixing valves. General technical specifications to demonstrate that the maximum temperature of 48°C cannot be exceeded in operation and that the product will fail-safe (i.e. not discharge water above the maximum temperature). Such valves should not be easily altered by
building users.

3.67 In-line blending valves and composite thermostatic mixing valves should be compatible with the sources of hot and cold water that serve them.

3.68 The length of supply pipes between in-line blending valves and outlets should be kept to a minimum in order to prevent the colonisation of waterborne pathogens. If intermittent use of the bath is anticipated, provision should be made for high temperature flushing to allow pasteurisation of the pipes and outlet fittings. Such events should be managed to prevent the risk associated with inadvertent use.

Notes:

1. Further guidance on the use of in-line blending valves can be found in BRE Information paper IP14/03 Preventing hot water scalding in bathrooms: using TMVs

2. In some buildings, e.g. care homes, in-line blending valves would need to meet the additional performance standards set out in NHS Estates Model specification D 08

Installation

3.69 Good workmanship is essential. Workmanship should be in accordance with appropriate standards such as BS 8000–15:1990 Workmanship on Building Sites Code of practice for hot and cold water services (domestic scale).

Commissioning of fixed building services

3.70 Water heaters require the input of energy to raise the temperature of water. It is therefore necessary to ensure their efficiency by proper installation and commissioning.

3.71 Fixed
building services, including controls, should be commissioned by testing and adjusting as necessary to ensure that they use no more fuel and power than is reasonable in the circumstances.

3.72 Commissioning means the advancement of these systems from the state of static completion to working order to achieving compliance with Part L. For each system it includes setting-to- work, regulation (that is testing and adjusting repetitively) to achieve the specified performance, the calibration, setting up and testing of the associated automatic control systems, and recording of systems and the performance test results that have been accepted as satisfactory.

3.73 Not all fixed
building services will need to be commissioned. For example, with some systems it is not possible as the only controls are ‘on’ and ‘off’ settings. In other cases commissioning would be possible but in the specific circumstances would have no effect on energy use.

3.74 Where commissioning is carried out it must be done in accordance with a procedure approved by the Secretary of State. For new and existing dwellings the approved procedure for hot water systems is set out in the Domestic Heating Compliance Guide; for
buildings other than dwellings in CIBSE Commissioning Code M.

3.75 Commissioning must be carried out in such a way as not to prejudice compliance with any applicable health and safety requirements.

3.76 Commissioning is often carried out by the person who installs the system. Sometimes it may be carried out by a subcontractor or by a specialist firm. It is important that whoever carries it out follows the relevant approved procedure in doing so.

Notice of completion of commissioning

3.77 The Building Regulations (regulation 20C(2)) and the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations (regulation 20(1) and (6)) require that the person carrying out the work shall give a notice to the relevant BCB that commissioning has been carried out according to a procedure approved by the Secretary of State, unless testing and adjustment is not possible, or would not affect the energy efficiency of the fixed building service.

3.78 Where the work is carried out in accordance with a
building notice, or full plans, or an initial notice or amendment notice, the notice of commissioning should be given not more than 5 days after the completion of the commissioning work. In other cases, for example where work is carried out by a person registered with a competent person scheme, it must be given not more than 30 days after the completion of work.

3.79 Where the installation of fixed building services which require commissioning is carried out by a person registered with a competent person scheme the notice of commissioning will be given by that person.

3.80 Until the BCB receives notice of commissioning it is unlikely to be satisfied that Part G has been complied with and consequently is unlikely to be able to give a completion/final certificate.

G4 Sanitary conveniences and washing facilities

The Requirement G4

This Approved Document deals with the following Requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

Sanitary conveniences and washing facilities

G4 (1) Adequate and suitable sanitary conveniences must be provided in rooms provided to accommodate them or in bathrooms.

(2) Adequate hand washing facilities must be provided in:

(a) rooms containing sanitary conveniences; or

(b) rooms or spaces adjacent to rooms containing sanitary conveniences.

(3) Any room containing a sanitary convenience, a bidet, or any facility for washing hands provided in accordance with paragraph (2)(b), must be separated from any kitchen or any area where food is prepared.

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G4 will be met if:

a. Sanitary conveniences of the appropriate type for the sex and age of the persons using the
building are provided in sufficient numbers, taking into account the nature of the
building; and

b. hand washing facilities are provided in, or adjacent to, rooms containing
sanitary conveniences and are sited, designed and installed so as not to be prejudicial to health.

General

4.1 Attention is also drawn to the requirements for accessible
sanitary conveniences and hand washing facilities of Part M (Access to and use of buildings) of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 and to Approved Document M and to the Regulators’ performance specification made under the Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148 as amended) for WC suites.

4.2 Requirement for ventilation is in Part F (Ventilation) of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010. Guidance on ventilation of
sanitary accommodation is given in Approved Document F.

4.3 The number, type and siting of
sanitary conveniences, including separate provision for men and women, for staff in workplaces are also subject to the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992. Attention is drawn to the Approved Code of Practice issued with respect to those Regulations.

4.4 Further guidance on washbasins associated with
sanitary conveniences may be found in the Food Standards Agency’s Code of Practice Food hygiene – a guide for businesses.

4.5 Guidance on the selection, installation and maintenance of sanitary appliances including composting toilets may be found in BS 6465- 3:2006
Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the selection, installation and maintenance of sanitary and associated appliances.

4.6 Where hot and cold taps are provided on a
sanitary appliance, the hot tap should be on the left.

Scale of provision and layout in dwellings

4.7 Any dwelling (house or flat) should have at least one
sanitary convenience and associated hand washing facility. This will include a
WC provided in accordance with paragraph M4 (Sanitary conveniences in dwellings) of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 and with Approved Document M.

Note: Paragraph M4 requires that a
sanitary convenience should be located in the principal/ entrance storey of a dwelling.

4.8 Where additional
sanitary conveniences are provided, each should have an associated hand washing facility.

4.9 To allow for basic hygiene, hand washing facilities should be located in:

a. the room containing the
sanitary convenience; or

b. an adjacent room or place that provides the sole means of access to the room containing the
sanitary convenience (provided that it is not used for the preparation of food).

4.10 A place containing a
sanitary convenience and/or associated hand washing facilities should be separated by a door from any place used for the preparation of food (including a kitchen) (see Diagrams 2 and 3).

Note: In dwellings, a room containing both a
sanitary convenience and a basin for hand washing does not need a separation lobby between this room and a kitchen or food preparation area (
Diagram 2). The layout for a room containing a
sanitary convenience only should be such that the room or space containing its associated hand washing facilities is accessed before entry to a food preparation area, and is separated from that area by a door (
Diagram 3).

4.11 Guidance on the provision of activity space around sanitary appliances is given in BS 6465-2:1996
Sanitary installations. Code of practice for space requirements for
sanitary appliances.


Diagram 2 Separation between hand washbasin/WC and food preparation area – single room


Diagram 3 Separation between hand washbasin/WC and food preparation area – two rooms

Scale of provision and layout in buildings other than dwellings

4.12 The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 require that a minimum number of sanitary conveniences must be provided in workplaces. The Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) that supports those Regulations sets out how to calculate that minimum requirement (guidance on those minimum numbers can be found at
http://www. hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg293.pdf).

4.13 Part M of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 sets out requirements relating to access to and use of buildings. Approved Document M provides guidance on the provision of suitable
sanitary accommodation. Such accommodation may form part of the total number of
sanitary conveniences provided within a building.

4.14 Further guidance on the provision of sanitary conveniences can be found in BS 6465-1:2006 + A1:2009 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the design of sanitary facilities and scales of provision of sanitary and associated appliances. This may be used for those building types not set out in paragraph 4.12 above or for those workplaces where the applicant wishes to provide more than the minimum recommended in the Approved Code of Practice, for example, to deliver equivalent provision for men and women.

4.15 A
sanitary convenience may be provided in:

a. a self-contained room which also contains hand washing facilities;

b. in a cubicle with shared hand washing facilities located in a room containing a number of cubicles; or

c. in a self-contained room with hand washing facilities provided in an adjacent room.

4.16 Urinals, WC cubicles and hand washing facilities may be in the same room.

4.17 A place containing a
sanitary convenience and/or associated hand washing facilities should be separated by a door from any place used for the
preparation of food (including a
kitchen).

Note: For workplaces, the Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 apply to the separation of a place containing a
sanitary convenience and/or associated hand washing facilities and a workplace.

4.18 Guidance on the provision of activity space around
sanitary appliances is given in BS 6465-2:1996
Sanitary installations. Code of practice for space requirements for
sanitary appliances.

Chemical and composting toilets

4.19 Chemical toilets or composting toilets may be used where:

a. suitable arrangements can be made for the disposal of the waste either on or off the site; and

b. the waste can be removed from the premises without carrying it through any living space or food preparation areas (including a
kitchen); and

c. no part of the installation would be installed in any places where it might be rendered ineffective by the entry of flood water.

4.20 There are currently no British or European standards for composting toilets. Appropriate guidance can be found in ANSI/NSF 41:2005 as amended by Addendum 1:2007 Non-liquid saturated treatment system.

4.21 Composting toilets should not be connected to an energy source other than for purposes of ventilation or sustaining the composting process.

Discharges to drains

Note: See Approved Document for requirement H1 Sanitary pipework and drainage for guidance on provision for traps, branch discharge pipes, discharge stacks and foul drains.

4.22 Any
WC fitted with flushing apparatus should discharge to an adequate system of drainage.

4.23 A
urinal fitted with flushing apparatus should discharge through a grating, a trap or mechanical seal and a branch pipe to a discharge stack or a drain.

4.24 A
WC fitted with a macerator and pump may be connected to a small bore drainage system discharging to a discharge stack if:

a. there is also access to a
WC discharging directly to a gravity system; and

b. the macerator and pump meets the requirements of BS EN 12050-1:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for wastewater containing faecal matter or BS EN 12050-3:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for wastewater containing faecal matter for limited applications.

Note: Where
greywater recycling is used, lower overall flows are to be expected and this should be taken into account in drain design. This is particularly relevant at the head of the drain where only one
building is connected to the drain.

G5 BATHROOMS

The Requirement G5

This Approved Document deals with the following requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

Bathrooms

G5 A bathroom must be provided containing a wash basin and either a fixed bath or a shower.

Requirement G5 applies only to dwellings and to buildings containing one or more rooms for residential purposes

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G5 will be met if a bathroom is provided containing a fixed bath or shower, and a washbasin.

General

5.1 The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148) make provisions for appropriate backflow protection on taps including mixer fittings and hose connections.

5.2 Requirements for ventilation are in Part F of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 (Ventilation). Guidance on ventilation of
sanitary accommodation is given in Approved Document F.

5.3 Requirements for electrical safety are given in Part P of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 (Electrical safety). Guidance is given in Approved Document P.

5.4 Guidance on the selection, installation and maintenance of
sanitary appliances may be found in BS 6465-3:2006 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the selection, installation and maintenance of sanitary and associated appliances.

5.5 Where hot and cold taps are provided on a
sanitary appliance, the hot tap should be on the left.

Scale of provision and layout in dwellings

5.6 Any dwelling (house or flat) must have at least one bathroom with a fixed bath or shower, and a washbasin.

5.7 Guidance on the provision of activity space around
sanitary appliances is given in BS 6465-2:1996 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for space requirements for sanitary appliances.

Scale of provision and layout in buildings with rooms for residential purposes

5.8 The number of fixed baths or showers and washbasins in
buildings with rooms for residential purposes should be in accordance with BS 6465-1:2006 and A1:2009 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the design of sanitary facilities and scales of provision of sanitary and associated appliances.

Discharges to drains

Note: See Approved Document for Requirement H1 Sanitary pipework and drainage for guidance on provision for traps, branch discharge pipes, discharge stacks and foul drains.

5.9 Any
sanitary appliance used for personal washing should discharge through a grating, a trap and a branch discharge pipe to an adequate system of drainage.

5.10 A
sanitary appliance used for personal washing fitted with a macerator and pump may be connected to a small bore drainage system discharging to a discharge stack if:

a. there is also access to washing facilities discharging directly to a gravity system; and

b. the macerator and pump meets the requirements of BS EN 12050-2:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for
buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for faecal-free wastewater.

G6: Food preparation areas

The Requirement G6

This Approved Document deals with the following requirement from Part G of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010.

Requirements Limits on application

Food preparation areas

G6 A suitable sink must be provided in any area where food is prepared.

Guidance

Performance

In the Secretary of State’s view Requirement G6 will be met if a
sink is provided in any place used for the
preparation of food (including a
kitchen).

Where a dishwasher is provided in a separate room, an additional sink need not be provided in that room.

Scale of provision in dwellings

6.1 A
sink should be provided in any
kitchen or place used for the
preparation of food.

6.2 Where a dishwasher is provided in a separate room that is not the principal place for the
preparation of food, an additional
sink need not be provided in that room.

Scale of provision in buildings other than dwellings

6.3 In all
buildings other than dwellings, there should be at least the same provision as described in 6.1.

6.4 In
buildings where the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/14) and the Food Hygiene (Wales) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/31 W5) apply, separate hand washing facilities may be needed. This is in addition to any hand washing facilities associated with WCs in accordance with Requirement G4.

Discharges to drains

Note: See Approved Document for Requirement H1 Sanitary pipework and drainage for guidance on provision for traps, branch discharge pipes, discharge stacks and foul drains.

6.5 Any
sink should discharge through a grating, a trap and a branch discharge pipe to an adequate system of drainage.

Annex 1: Wholesome water

A1.1 For ease of reference, the provisions on the wholesomeness of water in legislation made under section 67 of the Water Industry Act 1991 are set out below. This legislation is subject to Crown copyright protection, and is available in its original form on the United Kingdom Legislation web site, www.opsi.gov.uk/legislation. This web site is managed by Her Majesty’s Stationery Office on behalf of the Queen’s Printer.

For convenience, the relevant regulations and amendments concerned are reproduced here in a consolidated form with some deletions or additional text where it is considered it would assist comprehension. These are only extracts of the legislation, and in any case of doubt the original regulations and amendments should be consulted.

For reasons of brevity the Schedules and Tables of these Regulations are not reproduced here.

Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/3184)

Note: The Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2001 (SI 2001/3911) which apply in Wales contain equivalent requirements.

Wholesomeness

4. (1) Water supplied:

a. for such domestic purposes as consist in or include, cooking, drinking, food preparation or washing; or

b. to premises in which food is produced, shall, subject to paragraphs (4) and (5), be regarded as wholesome for the purposes of Chapter III [(quality and sufficiency of supplies) of Part III (water supply) of the Water Industry Act 1991], as it applies to the supply of water for those domestic purposes, if the requirements of paragraph (2) are satisfied.

(2) The requirements of this paragraph are:

a. that the water does not contain:

i. any micro-organism (other than a parameter listed in Schedule I) or parasite; or

ii. any substance (other than a parameter listed in Schedule I),

at a concentration or value which would constitute a potential danger to human health;

b. that the water does not contain any substance (whether or not a parameter) at a concentration or value which, in conjunction with any other substance it contains (whether or not a parameter) would constitute a potential danger to human health;

c. that the water does not contain concentrations or values of the parameters listed in Tables A and B in Schedule 1 in excess of or, as the case may be, less than, the prescribed concentrations or values;

d. that the water satisfies the formula [nitrate]/50 + [nitrite]/3 1, where the square brackets signify the concentrations in mg/l for nitrate (NO ) and nitrite (NO ).

(3) The point at which the requirements of paragraph (2), in so far as they relate to the parameters set out in Part I of Table A and in Table B in Schedule 1 are to be complied with, is:

a. in the case of water supplied from a tanker, the point at which the water emerges from the tanker;

b. in any other case, the consumer’s tap. (4) Water supplied for regulation 4(1) purposes shall not be regarded as wholesome for the purposes of Chapter III if, on transfer from a treatment works for supply for those purposes:

a. it contains a concentration of the coliform bacteria or E. coli parameter (items 1 and 2 in Part II of Table A in Schedule 1) in excess of the prescribed concentrations; or

b. it contains a concentration of nitrite in excess of 0.1mgNO /l.

(5) Subject to paragraph (6), water supplied for regulation 4(1) purposes shall not be regarded as wholesome for the purposes of Chapter III if, on transfer from a service reservoir for supply for those purposes, it contains a concentration of the coliform bacteria or E. coli parameter in excess of the prescribed concentrations.

(6) Water transferred from a service reservoir for supply for regulation 4(1) purposes shall not be regarded as unwholesome for the purposes of Chapter III because the maximum concentration for the coliform bacteria parameter is exceeded if, as regards the samples taken in any year in which the reservoir in question is in use, the results of analysis for that parameter establish that in at least 95 per cent of those samples coliforms were absent.

Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101)

Note: The Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations (SI 2010/66) which apply in Wales contain equivalent requirements.

Wholesomeness

4. Water is wholesome if all the following conditions are met:

a. it does not contain any micro-organism, parasite or substance, alone or in conjunction with any other substance, at a concentration or value that would constitute a potential danger to human health;

b. it complies with the concentrations or values specified in Part 1 of Schedule 1; and

c. in the water:

nitrate (mg/l)/50         nitrate (mg/l)/ 3×1

Annex 2 – Competent person self- certification schemes relevant to sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency work

i. Installation of a hot water system connected to a heat producing gas appliance

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC]

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA]

Capita Gas Registration and Ancillary Services Limited

CORGI Services Limited EC Certification Limited HETAS Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

Oil Firing Technical Association Limited

ii. Installation of a hot water system connected to an oil-fired combustion appliance

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC]

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA] CORGI Services Limited

EC Certification Limited

HETAS Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

Oil Firing Technical Association Limited [OFTEC]

iii. Installation of a hot water system connected to a solid fuel burning appliance

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC]

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA] CORGI Services Limited

EC Certification Limited NAPIT Registration Limited NICEIC Group Limited

Oil Firing Technical Association Limited [OFTEC]

HETAS Limited

iv. Installation of a hot water service connected to an electric heat source

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA] CORGI Services Limited

EC Certification Limited

HETAS Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

Oil Firing Technical Association Limited

v. Installation of a sanitary convenience, sink, washbasin, bidet, fixed bath, shower or bathroom in a dwelling (not involving work on underground drainage)

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC] CORGI Services Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

vi. Installation of a wholesome cold water supply or a softened wholesome cold water supply

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC]

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA] CORGI Services Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

vii. Installation of a non-wholesome water supply to a sanitary convenience fitted with a flushing device which does not involve work on shared or underground drainage

Association of Plumbing and Heating

Contractors (Certification) Limited [APHC]

Building Engineering Services Competence

Accreditation Limited [BESCA] CORGI Services Limited

NAPIT Registration Limited

NICEIC Group Limited

For a full and current list of all schemes, consult
www.communities.gov.uk

Annex 3 – References

Approved Documents (available at www.planningportal.gov.uk)

Approved Document A – Structure (2004 edition)

Approved Document B (Fire safety) – Volume 1: Dwellinghouses (2006 edition)

Approved Document B (Fire safety) – Volume 2: Buildings other than dwellinghouses (2006 edition)

Approved Document C – Site preparation and resistance to contaminants and moisture (2004 edition)

Approved Document D – Toxic substances (1992 edition)

Approved Document E – Resistance to the passage of sound (2003 edition)

Approved Document F – Ventilation (2006 edition) Approved Document H – Drainage and waste disposal (2002 edition)

Approved Document J – Combustion appliances and fuel storage systems (2002 edition)

Approved Document J – 2002 Edition: Guidance and supplementary information on the UK implementation of European Standards for chimneys and flues (2004 edition)

Approved Document K – Protection from falling, collision and impact (1998 edition)

Approved Document L1A: Conservation of fuel and power (New dwellings) (2006 edition)

Approved Document L1B: Conservation of fuel and power (Existing dwellings) (2006 edition)

Approved Document L2A: Conservation of fuel and power (New buildings other than dwellings) (2006 edition)

Approved Document L2B: Conservation of fuel and power (Existing buildings other than dwellings) (2006 edition)

Approved Document M – Access to and use of buildings (2004 edition)

Approved Document N – Glazing – safety in relation to impact, opening and cleaning (1998 edition)

Approved Document P – Electrical safety – dwellings (2006 edition)

Relevant legislation (available via www.opsi.gov.uk)

The Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010 (SI 2000/2215).

The Building Regulations 2010 (SI 2000/2214). The Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/14). HMSO, 2006.

The Food Hygiene (Wales) Regulations 2006 (SI 2006/31 W5). HMSO, 2006.

The Gas Safety (Installation and Use) Regulations 1994 (SI 1994/1886). HMSO, 1994.

The Private Water Supplies Regulations 2009 (SI 2009/3101). HMSO, 2009.

The Private Water Supplies (Wales) Regulations 2010 (SI 2010/66). HMSO, 2010.

The Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 (SI 1999/1148). HMSO, 1999.

The Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2000 (SI 2000/3184). HMSO, 2000.

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (SI 1992/3004). HMSO, 1992.

The Water Industry Act 1991 HMSO, 1991. The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 HMSO, 1974.

The European Communities Act 1972 HMSO, 1972.

Standards

ANSI-NSF 41:2005 + A1:2007. Non-liquid saturated treatment system. NSF, 2007.

BS EN 257:1992 Mechanical thermostats for gas-burning appliances. BSI, 1992.

BS 417-2:1987 Specification for galvanized low carbon steel cisterns, cistern lids, tanks and cylinders. Metric units. BSI, 1987.

BS 853-1:1996 Specification for vessels for use in heating systems. Calorifiers and storage vessels for central heating and hot water supply. BSI, 1996.

BS EN ISO 1043-1:2002 Plastics. Symbols and abbreviated terms. Basic polymers and their special characteristics.

BS EN 1111:1999 Sanitary tapware. Thermostatic mixing valves (PN 10). General technical specification. BSI, 1999.

BS EN 1287:1999 Sanitary tapware. Low pressure thermostatic mixing valves. General technical specifications. BSI, 1999.

BS EN 1490:2000 Building valves. Combined temperature and pressure relief valves. Tests and requirements. BSI, 2000.

BS 1566-1:2002 Copper indirect cylinders for domestic purposes. Open vented copper cylinders. Requirements and test methods. BSI, 2002.

BS 3198:1981 Specification for copper hot water storage combination units for domestic purposes. BSI, 1981.

BS 4213:2004 Cisterns for domestic use. Cold water storage and combined feed and expansion (thermoplastic) cisterns up to 500 l. Specification. BSI, 2004.

BS 5918:1989 Code of Practice for Solar heating systems for domestic hot water. BSI 1989.

BS 6283-2:1991 Safety and control devices for use in hot water systems. Specifications for temperature relief valves for pressures from 1 bar to 10 bar. BSI, 1991.

BS 6283-3:1991 Safety and control devices for use in hot water systems. Specification for combined temperature and pressure relief valves for pressures from 1 bar to 10 bar. BSI, 1991.

BS 6465-1:2006 + A1:2009 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the design of sanitary facilities and scales of provision of sanitary and associated appliances. BSI, 2006.

BS 6465-2:1996 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for space requirements for sanitary appliances. BSI, 1996.

BS 6465-3:2006 Sanitary installations. Code of practice for the selection, installation and maintenance of sanitary and associated appliances. BSI, 2006.

BS 6700:2006 + A1:2009 Design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages. Specification. BSI, 2006.

BS 7291-1:2006 Thermoplastics pipes and associated fittings for hot and cold water for domestic purposes and heating installations in buildings. General requirements.

BS 7291-2:2006 Thermoplastics pipes and associated fittings for hot and cold water for domestic purposes and heating installations in buildings. Specification for polybutylene (PB) pipes and associated fittings.

BS 7291-3:2006 Thermoplastics pipes and associated fittings for hot and cold water for domestic purposes and heating installations in buildings. Specification for cross-linked polyethylene (PE-X) pipes and associated fittings.

BS 7671:2008 Requirements for electrical installations (IET Wiring Regulations 17th Edition).

BS 8000-15:1990 Workmanship on Building Sites Code of practice for hot and cold water services (domestic scale). BSI, 1990.

BS 8515:2009 Rainwater harvesting systems, Code of Practice.

BS EN 12050-1:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for wastewater containing faecal matter.

BS EN 12050-2:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for faecal-free wastewater. BSI, 2001.

BS EN 12050-3:2001 Wastewater lifting plants for buildings and sites. Principles of construction and testing. Lifting plants for wastewater containing faecal matter for limited applications.

BS EN 12897:2006 Water supply. Specification for indirectly heated unvented (closed) storage water heaters. BSI, 2006.

BS EN 12976-1:2006 Thermal solar systems and components. Factory made systems. General requirements. BSI, 2006.

prCEN/TS 12977-1:2008 Thermal solar systems and components. Custom built systems. General requirements. BSI, 2001.

BS EN 15092:2008 Building valves. Inline hot water supply tempering valves. Tests and requirements. BSI, 2008.

BS EN 60335-2-21:2003 Household and similar electrical appliances. Safety. Particular requirements for storage water heaters. BSI, 2003.

BS EN 60335-2-35:2002 Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances. BSI, 2002.

BS EN 60335-2-73:2003 Specification for safety of household and similar electrical appliances. Particular requirements for fixed immersion heaters. BSI, 2003.

BS EN 60730-2-9:2002 Automatic electrical controls for household and similar use. Particular requirements for temperature sensing controls. BSI, 2002.

Other documents

Water Regulations Advisory Scheme. Water Regulations Guide. WRAS, 2000.

WRAS IGN 9-02-04: Issue 1: 1994. Reclaimed water systems. WRAS, 1994. (
www.wras.co.uk)

WRAS Information & Guidance Note No. 9-02- 05 Marking and identification of pipework for reclaimed (greywater) systems. WRAS, 1999. (
www.wras.co.uk)

Market Transformation Programme. Rainwater and greywater: technical and economic feasibility. MTP, 2007.

Market Transformation Programme. Rainwater and greywater: a guide for specifiers. MTP, 2007.

Market Transformation Programme. Rainwater and greywater: review of water quality standards and recommendations for the UK. MTP, 2007.

NHS D08 National Health Service Model Engineering Specifications Thermostatic Mixing Valves (Healthcare Premises). NHS.

BRE Information paper IP14/03 Preventing hot water scalding in bathrooms: using TMVs.

Food Standards Agency Code of Practice Food hygiene – a guide for businesses. (
www.food.gov.uk)

English Heritage publication Building Regulations and Historic Buildings, 2002 (revised 2004), (
www.english-heritage.org.uk)

European Council Directive 89/106/EEC, The Construction Products Directive.

European Council Directive 93/68/EEC, The CE Marking Directive.

The Code for Sustainable Homes, December 2006. (www.planningportal.gov.uk)

HSC publication Legionnaires’ Disease: Control of Legionella Bacteria in Water Systems. Approved code of practice and guidance. L8, Health and Safety Commission 2000. ISBN 0717617726

CIBSE Commissioning Code M: Commissioning Management, CIBSE, 2003. ISBN 1 90328 733 2

Health and Safety Commission, Workplace health, safety and welfare, Approved code of practice, HMSO 1992.

CIBSE Guide G: Public health engineering, CIBSE, 2004. ISBN 1 90328 742 1

CIBSE Domestic Building Services Panel: Solar heating design and installation guide, 2007. ISBN 978 1 90328 784 2

CLG publication, The Water Efficiency Calculator for new dwellings, BRE Global Ltd, September 2009. ISBN 978 1 4098 1827 4

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